Define cultural deviance theory. Theories of Deviance 2019-01-11

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Deviance Sociology

define cultural deviance theory

The late modern society easily accepts difference, but it labels those that it does not want as deviant and relentlessly punishes and persecutes. The enterprises in which these perspectives are engaged are in fact linked only by the objectively similar nature of their subject matter; conceptually and theoretically, they are worlds apart. Much of the writing in this tradition has addressed the differential processing of people defined as deviant. Deviant behaviors are actions that do not go along with the social institutions as what cause deviance. In contrast, macro-level theories focus on social aggregates or groups, looking to the structural characteristics of areas in explaining the origins of deviance, particularly rates of deviance among those groups. As time went on, homosexuality has come to be accepted as somewhat more mainstream. The removal of a positively valued stimulus, such as the death of a family member or the loss of a boyfriend or girlfriend, can also result in strain.

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The Functionalist Perspective on Deviance

define cultural deviance theory

Experts are already speculating that the psychological trauma of multiple redeployments contributed to Sgt. The group will therefore engage in communication to deal with the problem. The issue of social power cannot be divorced from a definition of deviance because some groups in society can criminalize the actions of another group by using their influence on legislators. Institutionalized Means to Success In the 1960s, sociologists Richard Cloward and Lloyd Ohlin theorized that the most difficult task facing industrialized societies is finding and training people to take over the most intellectually demanding jobs from the previous generation. Conversely, individuals concerned about the opinions of conforming others and who have heavy psychological investments in work or school will see the potential consequences of deviant acts—rejection by friends or loss of a job—as threatening or costly, and consequently will refrain from those acts.

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Strain and Cultural Deviance Theories Flashcards

define cultural deviance theory

Take, again, the example of homosexuality. This also corresponded to lower educational achievement and highest rates of generalized delinquency anything from petty theft to murder. Furthermore, the building of centralized shopping centers is not done with community solidarity in mind, but is merely the result of profit considerations. Power over subordinate collectivities does not, however, ensure their conformity or agreement among members of those collectivities that dominant definitions of right and wrong are just or righteous. As a result of these differential attributions, minority youths are perceived as more threatening, more at risk for re-offending than whites and more likely to receive severe recommendations for sentences.

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Deviance Theories

define cultural deviance theory

Criminological theory: Context and consequences, 4th ed. The bonds act as social and psychological constraints on the individual, binding persons to normative conformity Toby 1957; Hirschi 1969. This is just one example of how even the most deviant of actions can help bring people together and can clarify cultural norms and values. Anti-norm deviance describes a situation in which a group member expresses views that are opposed to the views of the group and agrees with or supports an out-group. Miller's theory is grounded in learning theory and ecological data; to the extent that the norms learned in lower-class settings depart from those of the dominant middle-class culture, the stage is set for culture conflict.

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Sociology Theories of Deviance and Deviant Behavior

define cultural deviance theory

Still, power is a factor in the social construction of norms — and hence, in defining what is deviant. In particular, Spitzer argued that deviant labels are applied to those individuals who interfere with the processes of capitalism. Deviance is a collective response to marginalisation. Secondary deviance is any action that takes place after primary deviance as a reaction to the institutional identification of the person as a deviant. Sociologists who seek explanations for deviance usually study behavior or psychic conditions that presumably cause behavior , only very rarely beliefs, and practically never physical traits. As examples, they cite wealthy and powerful businesspeople, politicians, and others who commit crimes. Problems with Psychological Theories of Deviance While psychiatric diagnoses are commonly used to explain deviance, one must remember that what counts as a legitimate diagnosis is always in contention.

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Deviance Definition Sociology

define cultural deviance theory

This led to status frustration: a sense of personal failure and inadequacy. He argued that deviance is a basis for change and , and it is also a way of defining or clarifying important social norms. Capacity to deal with strain depends on personal experience throughout life; many are equipped to deal with strain. Middle Class Measuring Rod Are children in the lower-class destined to fail? Formal sanctioning must be highly selective, focusing only on the most serious and threatening deviant acts. Cesare Lombroso was among the first to research and develop the Theory of Biological Deviance which states that some people are genetically predisposed to criminal behavior.


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Deviance Definition Sociology

define cultural deviance theory

Despite these criticisms, Merton's theory has had a major impact on contemporary criminology. These programs lower the cost of supervising people convicted of crimes and reduce prison overcrowding but have not been shown to reduce recidivism. The main idea is that there are areas within a population from which deviance arises, and crime rates are stable despite ethnic changes within the neighborhood. In order to compete in the world marketplace, a society must offer institutionalized means of succeeding. A great many of what we call manners, having no logical grounds, would make for good examples here. That collectivity can include, but is not coterminous with, the entire society. Because there are several boys going through the same experiences, they end up banding together and forming delinquent subcultures.

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The Functionalist Perspective on Deviance

define cultural deviance theory

In their research, Sampson and Laub focus on stability and change in the antisocial behavior of individuals as they grow from juveniles to adults. To repeat, all explanatory theorists are aware that definitions of right and wrong are relative from one society to another; all criminologists that seek explanations for crime are aware that laws criminalizing certain acts vary the world over. Robert Merton's 1938 writing on American social structure and Richard Cloward and Lloyd Ohlin's 1960 subsequent work on urban gangs laid the theoretical foundation for this perspective. Thus, sufficient exposure to peers endorsing beliefs favoring deviance who also have knowledge about the commission of deviant acts will cause the otherwise conforming juvenile to commit deviant acts. Moreover, to repeat, false accusations represent a case in which someone did not violate a norm but attracts censure anyway. Strain caused by the removal of positively valued stimuli from the individual e.


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Deviance Sociology

define cultural deviance theory

Individuals in the opposite scenario, in which the person both violates rules and is perceived by others as deviant, Becker labeled pure deviants. A social conflict theorist would argue that many actions are considered deviant because people in power have the resources to make those actions deviant. Neutralization theory Gresham Sykes and David Matza's neutralization theory explains how deviants justify their deviant behaviors by providing alternative definitions of their actions and by providing explanations, to themselves and others, for the lack of guilt for actions in particular situations. These theories typically examine the relationship between a person's involvement in deviance and such characteristics as the influence of peers and significant others, persons' emotional stakes in conformity, their beliefs about the propriety of deviance and conformity, and their perceptions of the threat of punishments for deviant acts. From a structural functionalist perspective, then, how does society change, particularly in regards to establishing norms and deviant behaviors? To the advocates of the constructionist approach, social control is the core of any socio logical understanding of deviance. In short, they argue, the mission of the sociologist of deviance, crime, and delinquency is to explain these phenomena, and in order to accomplish this mission it is necessary to conceptualize them essentialistically and objectivistically, that is, as possessing common, universal elements or components. The third main sociological theory of deviance is conflict theory.

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