To kill a mockingbird chapter 13 analysis. To Kill a Mockingbird summary 2019-01-06

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 analysis

She realizes how bad the Tom Robinson situation is because people are willing to hurt her father over it. Likewise, without people like Atticus going out of their way to help others, the darkness of prejudice could perpetuate itself indefinitely. Alexandra even forces Atticus to teach Scout and Jem about their family history. In this chapter, Atticus demonstrates his excellent skills as a lawyer. It is also noticeable unclear as to whether Atticus knew Mr. Alexandra moved right in and made herself at home, and soon enough it seemed as if she'd lived there forever. Upon moving in, she makes herself right at home and is well liked and welcomed by all the neighbors.

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Chapters 12

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 analysis

Jem is still concerned for Atticus's safety. He explains that they are 'half white' 'half black' and that they don't belong anywhere. Then she tries to engage him on the topic of his entailment, which she heard her father mention once, but notices that everyone is staring at her. The prosecution's attorney, , asks him about the events surrounding Tom Robinson and Mr. Dill tells a long story about being locked and chained in a basement and escaping with a traveling animal show. Atticus also reveals his fatal flaw: he tends to be overly optimistic or unrealistically hopeful at times.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 Summary

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 analysis

There was indeed a caste system in Maycomb, but to my mind it worked this way: the older citizens, the present generation of people who had lived side by side for years and years, were utterly predictable to one another: they took for granted attitudes, character shadings, even gestures, as having been repeated in each generation and refined by time. He could be a great huntsman if he had chosen; however, he believes it is unfair to use this talent on lesser creatures. Scout sometimes goes with him, and she and Jem watch as Mrs. Even though Aunt Alexandria fit into Maycomb like a glove Scout wondered how she should be Atticus and Uncle Jacks sister because she was so different from them. By Scout asking Jem how he knows that they didn't come from 'colored' people it shows her supporting equality. He shows himself to be a highly respectful man, and he carefully and deliberately outlines each piece of evidence. As he had talked, he had realized the ludicrous request Alexandra had made on him and his children and told them to ignore what he'd said.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 8

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 analysis

She orders Atticus to lecture them on the subject of their ancestry. Cunningham, confronted with the shame of the group's plans and having been reminded of his own responsibility in them, decides to remove himself from the scene, and everyone else follows. She has a drunken father, no mother, and seven siblings. Underwood despises black people, but was still willing to defend Atticus. She is partially blind to the color of others skin and for her, it is a good quality to have because she resembles Atticus. She fought him back, but he was too strong. For instance, his prediction that the Ku Klux Klan will never return is mistaken, and even though he doesn't believe anyone will cause trouble at the jail on a Sunday night, the town members prove him wrong.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 14 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 analysis

Even her aunt's constant pestering is a sign of her care for Scout, which is much better than the ambivalence that Dill experienced. However, she insists that he never lays a hand on her or beats her. When he finished, Jem and Scout are speechless. One night after getting home, Atticus comes to talk with Jem and Scout. Mayella went to school for a few years but none of her eight siblings go, and their mother is dead. Chapter 11 is the final chapter in Part I of the novel. Cunningham about how Walter is a good boy, and recounts how they invited him home for dinner one day, and asks Mr.

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Chapters 12

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 analysis

Avery, and Atticus is dismayed at the likeness. Cunningham, Walter's father, and as she tries to make conversation with him the entire group falls silent, listening to her talk about Walter and Mr. However, Jem and Scout lack the pride that Aunt Alexandra considers commensurate with being a Finch. Jem and Scout run a constant commentary for Dill, explaining the backgrounds and tendencies of everyone that passes. Scout and Jem receive strange looks and comments from some members of the church due to their skin color. Jack spanks her without hearing what Scout has to say, and Scout is upset.


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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 8

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 analysis

As Atticus was treating them so unusual Scout began to cry because she felt like she had lost her father and that Aunt Alexandria was going to control everything about her life even the way Atticus acted towards them. Cunningham emphasizes her knowledge of young and reminds Mr. . Dubose- whose house they pass everyday. With his high morals, Atticus will not lower himself to the violent measures used by others, even for his own self-defense. To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13 announced that she'd be staying with them because she and had decided that it was time the children had a feminine influence in their home.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 13

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 analysis

In chapter 14 Aunt Alexandra criticizes Calpurnia for bringing the children to church with her. Underwood reveals himself in a nearby window with a gun, pointing out that he had them covered the whole time. There is good in Mayella, her flowers are the only beautiful thing at the Ewell residence, and Scout thinks that Mayella seems to make an effort to keep herself clean, but her actions seem motivated by cowardice. She also appears quite afraid of Atticus. Atticus mentions that Scout also needs to learn not to get so angry over things because it will only get more difficult as the trial approaches. Scout also does not get along with her cousin, Francis.

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Chapters 12

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 analysis

Fire trucks arrive after that; unfortunately, they are unable to stop her house from burning down, but they do prevent other houses nearby from catching fire as well. Dubose was addicted to morphine, but that she wanted to die on her own terms. Chapter 13 Analysis In chapter 13 Aunt Alexandra starts to become in control of Jem and Finch. Aunt Alexandria had the theory that the longer you lived in one place the more dignified you were. Thus, discrimination is shown to be even more arbitrary and senseless. She gets angry when Atticus suggests that Bob Ewell beats her. Ewell says that he ran to get the sheriff.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 14 Summary & Analysis from LitCharts

to kill a mockingbird chapter 13 analysis

Despite everything that has happened, Miss Maudie is in good spirits the next day. Scout realizes how lucky she is to have a family that needs her. Atticus never shows disapproval of either Mr. Scout has a rebellious tone underlying the text. Maycomb reluctantly has bent the laws for the Ewells, and Mr. Scout recollects mentally the way that the Ewells live, in a tiny hut made of planks and corrugated iron and flattened tin cans, surrounded by junk salvaged from the nearby dump. She gets Jem to investigate, and they discover Dill hiding under Scout's bed.

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